Breast Feeding and Weight Loss

Breast feeding is both a practical skill and a performing art which is best learnt through apprenticeship — in this case to a breastfeeding mother.

Breast

Breast-feeding may even help you lose weight after the baby is born. Breast-feeding releases a hormone in a woman’s body that causes her uterus to return to its normal size and shape more quickly and reduces blood loss after delivery. Breast-feeding uses up calories and usually helps mothers lose some of the extra weight they gained during pregnancy.

Health

Health plans can influence both families and health care providers through targeted educational interventions promoting breast-feeding, and breast-feeding support services, provided before, during, and after birth. Health care providers can help to reduce obesity risk by regularly monitoring women’s weight; promoting appropriate prepregnancy weight, pregnancy weight gain, and postpartum weight loss; and explicitly encouraging maintenance of an active postpartum lifestyle. Health care providers should make every effort to encourage pregnant women to “stay in the range” of weight gain recommended by the Institute of Medicine. Healthy, balanced eating not only does your own body good, but it creates patterns for your children to follow throughout their lifetimes.

Postpartum

Postpartum Weight Loss Made Easy. Scientists have finally figured out the three small clues to helping moms shed that postpartum weight. Postpartum changes in maternal weight and body fat depots in lactating vs nonlactating women. Postpartum weight change: how much of the weight gained in pregnancy will be lost after delivery.

Exercise

Exercise does not interfere with your ability to breast-feed. Exercise, Without exercise, diet is rarely enough on its own to help you lose weight permanently.

Exercise is a part of the weight control equation, although it is important to follow your doctor’s advice about when to begin.

Normal

Normal Postpartum Weight Loss Patterns. The greatest amount of weight loss occurs in the first three months postpartum and then continues at a slow and steady rate until six months postpartum.

Breast feeding is by far the most advisable. Health plans can influence both families and health care providers through targeted educational interventions promoting breast-feeding, and breast-feeding support services, provided before, during, and after birth.